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Agile for Recruiters, Part 3

Posted By Gez Smith , Tuesday, January 10, 2017

  

During Part 3 of the Agile for Recruiters video series, Gez talks about the breadth of certifications that exist, from two day courses through years of experience. He also covers transferable certifications - ICF coaching, MBAs, in addition to psychology and counselling degrees and courses. Gez explains which certifications to look for and why, when recruiting for positions like Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches.

 

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Gez Smith is an agile coach, certified scrum master, and one of fewer than 150 certified scrum professionals in the UK, with over 10 years experience in Agile and Scrum. Through a varied career encompassing software sales, development, rollout and maintenance, he has delivered projects in all stages of the SDLC, in roles including developer, product owner and scrum master.

Gez is an active member of the UK Agile community, regularly attending and speaking at conferences and user group meetups. Having completed a research thesis on Agile as part of an MSc in Strategy, Change and Leadership, achieving a distinction grade. He has also published two books on Agile in the context of digital communications and is now seeking new opportunities to apply his Agile mindset and Scrum knowledge to various projects.

 

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Agile for Recruiters, Part 2

Posted By Gez Smith , Tuesday, January 3, 2017

 

Do recruiters fully understand the terms like Agile, Scrum, or Certified Scrum Professional? Is there a knowledge gap when it comes to recruiting Agile professionals? In Agile for Recruiters, Part 2 Gez explains his analysis of research collected from both Agile job seekers and recruiters to gain perspective on the Agile recruiting experience and how to improve the process.

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Gez Smith is an agile coach, certified scrum master, and one of fewer than 150 certified scrum professionals in the UK, with over 10 years experience in Agile and Scrum. Through a varied career encompassing software sales, development, rollout and maintenance, he has delivered projects in all stages of the SDLC, in roles including developer, product owner and scrum master.

Gez is an active member of the UK Agile community, regularly attending and speaking at conferences and user group meetups. Having completed a research thesis on Agile as part of an MSc in Strategy, Change and Leadership, achieving a distinction grade. He has also published two books on Agile in the context of digital communications and is now seeking new opportunities to apply his Agile mindset and Scrum knowledge to various projects.

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Agile for Recruiters, Part 1

Posted By Gez Smith , Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Agile recruiting is much different from traditional recruiting. In part one of this five-part video series, Gez Smith introduces the idea of Agile recruiting and talks about the topics he'll discuss in upcoming videos.

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Gez Smith is an agile coach, certified scrum master, and one of fewer than 150 certified scrum professionals in the UK, with over 10 years experience in Agile and Scrum. Through a varied career encompassing software sales, development, rollout and maintenance, he has delivered projects in all stages of the SDLC, in roles including developer, product owner and scrum master.

Gez is an active member of the UK Agile community, regularly attending and speaking at conferences and user group meetups. Having completed a research thesis on Agile as part of an MSc in Strategy, Change and Leadership, achieving a distinction grade. He has also published two books on Agile in the context of digital communications and is now seeking new opportunities to apply his Agile mindset and Scrum knowledge to various projects.

Tags:  agilepractices  ecruiting  gile HR  iring  R 

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Meaningful Careers and Growth (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 4)

Posted By Fabiola Eyholzer, Tuesday, December 20, 2016

This post is part of the Q&A Series: Agile Leadership Webinar «Agile HR | People Operations»

We recently hosted Agile HR expert Fabiola Eyholzer for our Agile Leadership Webinars. In response to the high interest, Fabiola is answering an aggregation of the great questions we received from participants during the webinar. Click here to watch full webinar.

In this part, Fabiola answers your questions on careers and development for Agile teams. If you have a question you would like featured in our Q&A series, please submit to chudson@scrumalliance.com.

 

What are the ways in which HR/managers can promote people in Agile?

The meaning of promotion is changing. Modern careers are more about personal choices and meaningful growth than climbing a (fast-disappearing) hierarchical ladder. Every person has a different understanding of growth. For some people, it is taking on a leadership role, whereas for others it is to deepen their T-shaped skills. In an Agile enterprise, we respect individuality. We strive to make the best match between individual aspirations and corporate demands. Consequently, career paths are becoming more fluid, multifaceted, and individualized than ever before.

 

What is the career path in Agile?

Instead of a predefined career path, we offer an adaptive growth model. Naturally, there are career paths that are more common than others. A programmer is more likely to become a senior software developer than a ScrumMaster. But the opportunity is there.

A catalog of prospective role-based career paths illustrates the most typical growth options. But it does not limit the options. And HR combines that with a continuous dialogue about growth and opportunities. That way you are aware of your options and can keep them open. Some companies even mandate a rotation of teams at least every three years.

 

Roles in Agile teams are limited. How does HR help motivate a team member without any change in the role?

Obviously, we acknowledge experience. Our reference roles reflect various seniority levels (like senior Agile coach). But the motivation does not come from promoting people. Instead, we create an inspiring and engaging work environment with great learning opportunities. We offer exciting work, amazing colleagues, and meaningful growth.

 

Who is responsible for a career?

You are. Agile is all about the principle of self-management. But employees are not only empowered when it comes to their work. They are also in charge when it comes to learning and development. HR and leaders provide the necessary platforms and support, but employees decide for themselves how they want to structure and approach their learning and growth path according to their own understanding and needs.

 

What do you do with older employees almost ready to retire?

We engage with all employees in the same way, no matter how long an employee has served in the labor market. Everyone in the company is valuable, otherwise we would not employ them. We still discuss where they stand, where they want to go, and what they need to get there.

Naturally, the growth profile will differ depending on a person’s circumstances. A new parent may want to take on a role with limited travel needs and a highly flexible schedule. And someone with an upcoming retirement may want to switch from a leadership to a mentoring role.

 

How can HR be more knowledgeable about the work an employee has accomplished, so as not to have to blindly depend on feedback from managers?

We previously argued for a shift from traditional performance management to iterative performance flow. Part of that is eliminating employee appraisals and decoupling HR instruments (like compensation and promotions). We no longer rate people and document results on outdated goals. Instead, HR engages in career coaching to help employees create and improve their career and growth profile.

 

How can HR be a career adviser to an employee?

Career advisers act as trusted mentors, consultants, and representatives of people within the organization. They engage in a continuous dialogue with each employee individually. They collaborate to create and manage a personal career and growth profile.

This equips HR with a completely new knowledge and understanding of their current and potential talent pipeline. HR no longer depends on a rating from an annual appraisal, because they know people’s talents on a personal, authentic level.

 

How does Agile workforce planning and talent scouting work?

Workforce designers collaborate with the epic leads to assess current and upcoming allocation needs. They know what new initiatives are coming up or if others are being canceled. They partner up with talent scouts, who identify and connect talents across the organization.

In other words: Workforce planning is about understanding and meeting the needs of the organization. Career coaching is about understanding and boosting the growth of employees. And talent scouting is about matching the organizational needs with the aspirations of people. The three go hand in hand and are the key to building a successful talent pool and offering fluid careers.

 

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About Fabiola:

Fabiola Eyholzer (CSPO, SPC 4.0) is an expert and thought leader in Lean/Agile People Operations the 21st-century HR approach and CEO of Just Leading Solutions, a New York-based consultancy for Agile HR.

Feel free to connect with Fabiola on Twitter (@FabiolaEyholzer) or LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/fabiolaeyholzer).

Tags:

agile, human resources, people operations, eyholzer, employee engagement, talent, digital age, transformation, future of work, work trends, scrum, hiring, talent acquisition, culture, values, practices, principles, compensation & benefits, reward, bonus, learning, development, talent management, career, webinar, scrum alliance

Tags:  agile  bonus  compensation & benefits  culture  development  digital age  employee engagement  eyholzer  future of work  hiring  human resources  learning  people operations  practices  principles  reward  scrum  talent  talent acquisition  talent management  transformation  values  work trends 

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Interview Preparation – A Little Planning Goes a Long Way

Posted By AgileCareers, Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Congratulations! Finally, one of the dozens of applications you’ve submitted has produced an interview. Now is not the time to sit back and try to wing it during the interview. When you finally get an interview, don’t rest on your laurels! Now, the hard work begins. You have to prepare.

Learn about the company

Visit the company’s website to learn about what the company does to make money, the company’s history, the mission and vision statements and any recent information. Many companies include press releases on their website. Reading the last few press releases will provide you with both company and industry insight. And don’t forget to look at the careers section. The careers section will give you an indication of whether or not the company is growing. Also, job descriptions typically give you a good synopsis on the company from a marketing perspective.

Learn about the interviewers

Use LinkedIn.com to research the people who will be interviewing you. Look for any commonalities between your background and their background, such as previous employers, education, community involvement, etc. Knowing about the individuals will help to focus on the people rather than mechanics of an interview.

Prepare a few questions

Based on your research of the job, company and interviewers, prepare a few questions both to show that you’re interested and to determine if the company will be a fit for you. Limit yourself to less than 10 questions; five questions is probably best. You don’t want to overwhelm them.

Review your application

This should include your resume, cover letter, portfolio, and online profiles. In preparing your application, you probably customized it to for this opportunity and reviewed it a hundred times. You think you have it memorized but it never hurts to review it one more time before an interview. The last thing you want to have happen is for the interviewer to ask you a question regarding something on your application and for you to act completely mystified. Refreshing your memory only takes a few minutes.

If you listed your attributes or technical skills, make sure you are prepared to answer questions about those attributes or technical skills. If you say you’re “creative,” be prepared to give an example of your creativity. If you say you’re a C# expert, be prepared to talk about your experience and be tested on C#.

Plan your pre-interview time

Prepare a plan and be ready to deviate from the plan as conditions change. Map out how you’re going to get to the interview. Take traffic conditions and parking into consideration. Give yourself plenty of time to get to the interview. Arriving 30 minutes early will keep you from feeling rushed, and you will have some time before the interview to relax. Don’t go into the company until about five to 10 minutes before the interview – you don’t want to arrive too early. Instead, sit in your car or take a quick walk and think about what questions they may ask and what your responses would be.

Dress appropriately

Agile companies can often have a casual atmosphere. Use your research to gauge the culture and environment of the organization. Then, select clothing that reflects that work environment. More importantly, show up to the interview clean and presentable. And don’t smoke cigarettes before arriving.  Showing up smelling bad or smelling like smoke is a sure fire way to bomb the interview.

Believe it or not, many candidates fail to follow one or more of these six simple suggestions and then wonder why they weren’t selected for a position. During the interview process, there are many things outside of your control. You might as well control what you can, and these six suggestions are things you can do to stack the deck in your favor.

 

Good luck with that interview.

 

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AgileCareers is dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals. We strive to Transform the World of Work by offering a platform that has the resources and technology to help build those professional synergies.