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Meaningful Careers and Growth (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 4)

Posted By Fabiola Eyholzer, Tuesday, December 20, 2016

This post is part of the Q&A Series: Agile Leadership Webinar «Agile HR | People Operations»

We recently hosted Agile HR expert Fabiola Eyholzer for our Agile Leadership Webinars. In response to the high interest, Fabiola is answering an aggregation of the great questions we received from participants during the webinar. Click here to watch full webinar.

In this part, Fabiola answers your questions on careers and development for Agile teams. If you have a question you would like featured in our Q&A series, please submit to chudson@scrumalliance.com.

 

What are the ways in which HR/managers can promote people in Agile?

The meaning of promotion is changing. Modern careers are more about personal choices and meaningful growth than climbing a (fast-disappearing) hierarchical ladder. Every person has a different understanding of growth. For some people, it is taking on a leadership role, whereas for others it is to deepen their T-shaped skills. In an Agile enterprise, we respect individuality. We strive to make the best match between individual aspirations and corporate demands. Consequently, career paths are becoming more fluid, multifaceted, and individualized than ever before.

 

What is the career path in Agile?

Instead of a predefined career path, we offer an adaptive growth model. Naturally, there are career paths that are more common than others. A programmer is more likely to become a senior software developer than a ScrumMaster. But the opportunity is there.

A catalog of prospective role-based career paths illustrates the most typical growth options. But it does not limit the options. And HR combines that with a continuous dialogue about growth and opportunities. That way you are aware of your options and can keep them open. Some companies even mandate a rotation of teams at least every three years.

 

Roles in Agile teams are limited. How does HR help motivate a team member without any change in the role?

Obviously, we acknowledge experience. Our reference roles reflect various seniority levels (like senior Agile coach). But the motivation does not come from promoting people. Instead, we create an inspiring and engaging work environment with great learning opportunities. We offer exciting work, amazing colleagues, and meaningful growth.

 

Who is responsible for a career?

You are. Agile is all about the principle of self-management. But employees are not only empowered when it comes to their work. They are also in charge when it comes to learning and development. HR and leaders provide the necessary platforms and support, but employees decide for themselves how they want to structure and approach their learning and growth path according to their own understanding and needs.

 

What do you do with older employees almost ready to retire?

We engage with all employees in the same way, no matter how long an employee has served in the labor market. Everyone in the company is valuable, otherwise we would not employ them. We still discuss where they stand, where they want to go, and what they need to get there.

Naturally, the growth profile will differ depending on a person’s circumstances. A new parent may want to take on a role with limited travel needs and a highly flexible schedule. And someone with an upcoming retirement may want to switch from a leadership to a mentoring role.

 

How can HR be more knowledgeable about the work an employee has accomplished, so as not to have to blindly depend on feedback from managers?

We previously argued for a shift from traditional performance management to iterative performance flow. Part of that is eliminating employee appraisals and decoupling HR instruments (like compensation and promotions). We no longer rate people and document results on outdated goals. Instead, HR engages in career coaching to help employees create and improve their career and growth profile.

 

How can HR be a career adviser to an employee?

Career advisers act as trusted mentors, consultants, and representatives of people within the organization. They engage in a continuous dialogue with each employee individually. They collaborate to create and manage a personal career and growth profile.

This equips HR with a completely new knowledge and understanding of their current and potential talent pipeline. HR no longer depends on a rating from an annual appraisal, because they know people’s talents on a personal, authentic level.

 

How does Agile workforce planning and talent scouting work?

Workforce designers collaborate with the epic leads to assess current and upcoming allocation needs. They know what new initiatives are coming up or if others are being canceled. They partner up with talent scouts, who identify and connect talents across the organization.

In other words: Workforce planning is about understanding and meeting the needs of the organization. Career coaching is about understanding and boosting the growth of employees. And talent scouting is about matching the organizational needs with the aspirations of people. The three go hand in hand and are the key to building a successful talent pool and offering fluid careers.

 

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About Fabiola:

Fabiola Eyholzer (CSPO, SPC 4.0) is an expert and thought leader in Lean/Agile People Operations the 21st-century HR approach and CEO of Just Leading Solutions, a New York-based consultancy for Agile HR.

Feel free to connect with Fabiola on Twitter (@FabiolaEyholzer) or LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/fabiolaeyholzer).

Tags:

agile, human resources, people operations, eyholzer, employee engagement, talent, digital age, transformation, future of work, work trends, scrum, hiring, talent acquisition, culture, values, practices, principles, compensation & benefits, reward, bonus, learning, development, talent management, career, webinar, scrum alliance

Tags:  agile  bonus  compensation & benefits  culture  development  digital age  employee engagement  eyholzer  future of work  hiring  human resources  learning  people operations  practices  principles  reward  scrum  talent  talent acquisition  talent management  transformation  values  work trends 

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Shifting to Iterative Performance Flow (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 2)

Posted By Fabiola Eyholzer, Thursday, November 24, 2016
Updated: Monday, November 21, 2016

Shifting to Iterative Performance Flow (Agile HR – Q&A Series Part 2)

This post is part of the Q&A Series: Agile Leadership Webinar «Agile HR | People Operations».

We recently hosted Agile HR expert Fabiola Eyholzer for our Agile Leadership Webinars. In response to the high interest, Eyholzer is answering an aggregation of the great questions we received from participants during the webinar. Click here to watch full webinar

In Part 2, Eyholzer answers your questions about performance management in Agile organizations. If you have a question you would like featured in our Q&A Series, please submit to chudson@scrumalliance.com.

Performance cycles are generally annual or semiannual. What cycles are appropriate in an Agile world?

Considering the accelerated pace of today’s business world, it is increasingly difficult to set meaningful goals on an annual or even semiannual basis. We need shorter cycles with an optimal balance of responsiveness, predictability, and reliability. Iterations are the new performance cycles.

Many organizations are doing away with the bell curve. What are your thoughts?

I absolutely agree. Bell curves (a.k.a. forced distribution, staked rankings) are demotivating, unnecessarily aggressive, and damaging to human relationships. Ten percent of Fortune 500 companies have already eliminated employee appraisals. Among them is GE the original champion of the bell curve.

Can eliminating appraisals demotivate a good employee from giving her best?

Quite the opposite. Objectives are replaced by meaningful stories, annual reviews become an ongoing dialogue, and improvement plans turn into interactive learning and growth. By doing this, we are engaging with people on a completely different level. That is inspiring for people and taps into their intrinsic motivation.

What is the most effective way to evaluate and get feedback of an employee?

In Agile, we don’t want to “evaluate” people. Instead we want to be forward-looking and focus on strengths. What we want to do with employees is more important than what we think of them. Every people leader must be able to answer questions like, “What would we do if that person quit today? Would we try to keep them and if yes, what would it take?” That requires them to have regular dialogue to discuss personal learning and growth potentials.

What do you mean by continuous feedback?

Relentless improvement is an integral part of any learning organization. Feedback conversations cannot only take place once or twice a year. We need to fundamentally increase the frequency but also the intensity and quality of feedback. That means shaping a culture of mutual respect where candid dialogue and continuous feedback is consistently happening. Feedback comes in different forms and structures. But feedback is not something only given from manager to subordinate. The power of feedback is in everyone’s hand.

Do you think 360-degree feedback could successfully take over traditional appraisal?

No, it cannot. A 360-degree approach is often lengthy and inadequate. We assume that ratings measure the performance of the rate, but they actually reveal more about the rater. Studies show that 62% of a rating depends on the individual rater. The actual performance only accounts for 21%A 360-degree approach with many raters does not rectify that it remains an inadequate appraisal.

What criteria should be used to evaluate people and teams in an Agile setting?

The focus is no longer on assessing individual goals and looking back. Performance flow is about continuous improvement not only on a personal but also on an enterprise level (a part neglected in traditional performance appraisals). Agile ceremonies like reviews and retrospectives are all about inspecting and adapting.

We measure results to understand where we stand and whether we are moving into the right direction. It also helps us be accountable. Key performance indicators (KPIs) become indicators again. And we don’t measure things to set compensation and shape a career. An example: Velocity is an invaluable indicator. But it makes terrible appraisal criteria for compensation and promotions. That is why we decouple performance management from HR instruments.

If we have seven business units, and each unit has its own portfolio manager, how does HR evaluate each portfolio performance? What are the criteria to do that?

It is not the task of HR to evaluate (portfolio) performance. This is the responsibility of Agile Teams and teams of teams. As criteria, they choose a set of metrics that gives them the data needed to continuously inspect and adapt.

What role would HR play in helping individuals improve their performance, if any?

We empower people to be in charge not only of their work but also of their own development. That is why HR takes a supporting role. HR assists leaders, acts as career coach to employees, and provides active learning platforms. The latter includes embedding knowledge building into the work flow. Examples of this are FedEx Days, hackathons, Wicked Wednesdays, etc.

How do you report someone who is not engaging or acting as part of the team? How do you handle situations where an individual negatively influences the team?

Performance (and behavioral) issues must be dealt with immediately there is no point in waiting for an annual review to come up. Agile Teams often handle challenges directly or, if need be, engage the help of their ScrumMaster or Agile coach. Other cases are escalated to the manager, and he or she must act. And, yes, this may mean transitioning people to a different team or releasing them back into the work space. Such a decision cannot be delayed (the motto is: “Hire slow, fire fast”).

What type of paperwork do you provide or fill out for performance reviews via iterations? And how does HR collect the data?

There are different types and levels of documentation and not everything is reported to HR. Ongoing feedback between manager and subordinate, as well as among peers, is between the involved parties. We want the focus to be on the feedback part, not the implications it has on any HR instruments. Agile Teams document some information in their retrospective; other interactions go undocumented. More structured feedback loops typically only involve a message to HR that the conversation or exchange has taken place. HR is not privy to the details. But HR is documenting the individual learning and growth profiles.

What kind of transition do you recommend?

An iterative approach. It starts by analyzing the current process, clarifying the reasons for change, and describing the desired outcome. The book Below Expectations: Why Performance Appraisals Fail in the Modern Working World and What to Do Insteadby Armin Trost, provides valuable tips to guide that discussion. This helps to identify and verify possible methods that might work for the organization. Any chosen solution must be aligned with their corporate values and Agile/people approach. 

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Fabiola Eyholzer (CSPO, SPC 4.0) is an expert and thought leader in Lean/Agile people operations the 21st-century HR approach and CEO of Just Leading Solutions, a New York-based consultancy for Agile HR.

Feel free to connect with Fabiola via Twitter (@FabiolaEyholzer) or LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/fabiolaeyholzer). 

Tags:  Agile  bonus  compensation & benefits  culture  digital age  employee engagement  eyholzer  flow  future of work  hiring  human resources  learning  people operations  performance management  practices  principles  reward  scrum  talent  talent acquisition  transformation  values  work trends 

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Thank You for Attending the AgileCareers Virtual Career Fair

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Wednesday, November 16, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, November 16, 2016

It was a wonderful opportunity to network with many of you at the 3 November AgileCareers Virtual Career Fair. We had more than 550 in attendance and 721 total conversations. View the infographic below for highlights from the Career Fair.

 

 

AgileCareers is built on best-in-class, enterprise-grade job board technology. Job seekers will gain a massive increase in relevant job opportunities, as the AgileCareers job board will be fueled by JobTarget’s large network of the top career sites around the world.

Job seekers, upload your resume by 10 December, and you will be entered into our sweepstakes to win a $100 Visa gift card!

Be sure to visit the AgileCareers blog for the latest happenings as we continue Transforming the World of Work®!

Tags:  Agile Jobs  Hiring  Recruiting  Virtual Career Fair 

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Why Attending an Online Career Fair is a No-Brainer for Employers

Posted By AgileCareers , Wednesday, October 12, 2016

In 2016, you would be hard-pressed to walk into a local coffee shop or library and not find every person within the confines of the space in possession of a smartphone, laptop, or tablet (and in some cases, all three).

 

As mobile devices become increasingly commonplace, growing numbers of professionals are turning online for everything from research to record-keeping, to seeking out new career opportunities.

 

One of the fastest growing segments of the online recruiting world are Virtual Career Fairs. Much like an Onsite Career Fair, these events attract exhibiting employers and jobseekers in an environment where they can connect and engage in conversations, although in an online event this all occurs without the need for travel.

 

The absence of travel costs is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the many reasons why Online Career Fairs have gained such immense popularity in the past several years. Along with the ease of use of online platforms, there is an incredible efficiency in recruiting at a Virtual Fair that just can’t be duplicated elsewhere. 

 

As a recruiter, you’ll have the ability to interview highly qualified candidates in your niche without having to leave your desk. You can pre-qualify candidates in your virtual line, view resumes while chatting with jobseekers, hold multiple one-on-one chats simultaneously, conduct follow-ups both during and after the event, and rate and take personal notes of each candidate you speak with. You’ll have access to a history page where all of their conversations, ratings, and notes are saved, and in the course of three hours you can have several dozen first touch interviews!

 

Come join us for the AgileCareers Virtual Career Fair on November 3, 2016 and connect with job seekers. The Virtual Career Fair adds value for hiring companies.

  • Employers may purchase booths and develop company profiles prior to the fair
  • Conduct up to dozens of first-round interviews with qualified candidates during the fair
  • Up to four recruiters may showcase open positions in the customized virtual booth
  • A rating system is in place for employers to score interactions and record notes

All conversations will take place from the comfort of attendees’ home or office – no suit or travel necessary! The event will take place on November 3, 2016 from 1 – 4 p.m. EST. To register, please visit the AgileCareers website at http://www.agilecareers.com/ and click on the banner at the top of the page.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Tags:  agilepractices  hiring  HR  recruiting 

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Want to Develop a Strong Talent Pipeline? Four Things to Consider

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Wednesday, August 31, 2016

AUTHOR: FABIOLA EYHOLZER

The following article was sparked from a tweet shared by Meghan M. Biro:


 

I absolutely agree.

Identifying, attracting and engaging the right people is key to building a strong workforce. But finding top talents is getting harder and harder. And all too often, HR fails to build a valid talent pipeline and can only fall back on a limited number of (more or less suitable) applicants.
Here are four things lean | agile enterprises do to build a sound talent pipeline:

  • Boost internal careers for employees
  • Turn alumni into great ambassadors
  • Proactively connect with potential talents
  • Engage with your current applicants

 

1. Boost internal career for employees

Most jobs are filled with outside candidates without prior knowledge or experience within your organization. And current employees are often overlooked. Unfortunately, in many organizations today, internal transfers are often restricted to a silo (you move up if your boss moves), die before they come to anything or are no more than a lip service.
Of course on paper organizations promote internal careers and usually have some example(s) at hand of such a growth story. But the reality is often far from it. There are several reasons including:

  • managers don’t want to lose their top performer to a different unit
  • employees don’t apply to avoid consequences if it might not work out
  • internal people lose out against outside candidates

(The last point always makes me wonder: Why do we trust the claims of outside applicants, whom we have not previously known, to deliver huge results, but we doubt our own internal candidates, who have proven themselves over and over again? BTW: This is just one of the things lean | agile People Operations successfully address.)

When it comes to enabling internal careers, HR plays a key role as adviser and people advocate. But here’s the hard and sad truth: Employees do not trust HR. We all know the story: Bright, highly engaged employee seeks out HR representative to discuss development plans and career options; even before he/she makes it back to the desk, HR has already made “the call” to the manager and soon after, the employee is looking for a new job outside of the company.

Unfortunately, this is neither a new nor a unique story and shows the reality in many organizations. The acting parties do not have any bad intentions, but the actions lead to an undesirable (and unnecessary) outcome.

Lean | agile enterprises actively promote and highly encourage career moves across the organizational network. After all, what could be more appealing than filling position with someone you already know and trust and who knows your organization and its values? You can boost knowledge sharing and strengthen internal networks while at the same time giving employees a great incentive for a great growth and advancement opportunities within the company.

They see their role as enablers and facilitators. They take pride if they helped to develop someone and see them take a new step. And that behavior is strongly encouraged and rewarded throughout the organization. The key difference is that lean | agile teams are not afraid to let their best people move on – especially not within the company.

 

2. Turn alumni into great ambassadors

Even if someone is moving on outside of their company, agile leaders accept it and ensure the transition is done with integrity, and the connection is not broken the minute the parting employee announces his/her departure or talks honestly and openly about pursuing other career options.

The first and the last day in a job are probably among most memorable times within a company. Typically on the first day we try to make a great impression, but the last day is far too often marked by bad feelings. That does not have to be like that.

Lean | agile enterprises make sure to part on the best terms and build a strong alumni network. After all you want your alumni to be great ambassadors for your company beyond their employment. They might choose to come back and/or refer you as amazing company to new customers and potential employees.

 

3. Proactively connect with potential talents

If you want to build a solid talent pipeline, HR has to reach out and engage with potential talents. And that has to take place long before you look to fill any open positions. Employer branding is essential. It must be authentic and takes place on different levels and will not only include your organization but also the personal branding of your employees and how they will speak about you.

Even though a distinct positioning of your organization is important, the more important part is to know your target audience. Understand their values and needs and determine their articulated and unarticulated motivations for potential occupational changes, and follow up with suitable initiatives.

Referral programs, interest forms, regular advertisements, social media activities and brand awareness campaigns are some of the things you can do. But above all: invest in personal interactions, one-on-one conversations and networking in and outside the organization. Go to meetups, events, conferences and other places your target people are likely to be and connect.

That way you cannot only showcase your great organization but also observe and get to know potential candidates in a more relaxed setting. That will lead to more honest and authentic experience and discussion than you are likely to get during a traditional interviewing process. You get a first indication of their suitability for your workforce and compatibility with your corporate culture.

So the minute you need to fill a position, you can tap into that pool of talents and address suitable candidates. And match them up with applications coming in through the normal recruiting channels. That will leave you with a stronger, more valid talent pool not only on a quantitative but more importantly on a qualitative level.

 

4. Engage with current applicants

You might wonder why this is the last point on the list and not the first one. After all, incoming applicants are likely to be the largest pool for talent sourcing within your organization. However, for all the reasons mentioned before, I believe that it does not have to be, nor should it be, that way.

The reason many organizations believe that they are not able to employ the best talents usually has little to do with their recruitment process but with the fact that they do not have a strong talent pipeline to begin with and are forced to choose employees from a B-rated candidate pool. If you now factor in that the risk of hiring an “unknown” person, the chances of a successful hire are even slimmer.

This is not to say that it is not a valid and important source of new talents. Applications that reach you through your traditional recruitment efforts are important and there is no way we can do without a stream of new applicants. But we simply cannot limit it to that. If we want to build a powerful workforce, we must also invest into the strategies outlined above – and then create an amazing experience for top candidates.

 

Are you ready to fill that talent pipeline?

This article was originally published on Just Leading Solutions, by Fabiola Eyholzer

Tags:  agile  hiring  HR  talent 

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AgileCareers is dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals. We strive to Transform the World of Work by offering a platform that has the resources and technology to help build those professional synergies.