Help Center | Print Page | Sign In | Register
AgileCareers Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Get the latest news on AgileCareers! AgileCareers.com is dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals. We strive to Transform the World of Work by offering a platform that has the resources and technology to help build those professional synergies.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: agile  hiring  scrumpractices  agilepractices  interviews  job posting  scrummaster  leadership  scrum  talent  talent acquisition  bonus  compensation & benefits  culture  digital age  employee engagement  eyholzer  future of work  HR  human resources  learning  people operations  practices  principles  product owner  Recruiting  reward  Technology  transformation  values 

Save the Date!

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Friday, August 26, 2016

 

About this Event

The AgileCareers Virtual Career Fair connects you directly with employers that have open career opportunities from the comfort of your home or office.

You will log in and see employers that want to hire talent, the specific opportunities they have available, and information about each hiring organization. You will choose which employers you want to interact with and then engage in a one-on-one chat directly with a recruiter from those organizations. You can share your background, experience, resume, and ask questions.

Following each chat interview, you'll be able to go back to the Event Lobby and select additional recruiters to chat with from other participating employer companies!

The AgileCareers Virtual Career Fair connects you in real time with employers seeking to recruit top talent. 


Who should attend the event?

AgileCareers is built on best-in-class, enterprise-grade job board technology! Job seekers will gain a massive increase in relevant job opportunities, as the AgileCareers job board will be fueled by YourMembership's large network of the top career sites around the world. You will have the ability to customize your profile, job alerts, and upload your resume for passive job searching and will have access to a regular flow of new content and resources.

AgileCareers is powered by Scrum Alliance®, the largest, most established and influential professional certification organization in the Agile community with more than 400,000 practitioners worldwide. Its vision is to "Transform the World of Work.” Its mission is to guide and inspire individuals, leaders, and organizations with practices, principles, and values that create workplaces that are joyful, prosperous, and sustainable. Scrum is at the foundation of all its products, services, and solutions.

 

Many of the job seekers on AgileCareers have been trained and certified by Scrum Alliance and have achieved their Certified ScrumMaster® certification or Certified Scrum Product Owner® certification. These individuals are ready to join your Scrum and Agile teams!

Tags:  agile  career fair  scrumpractices 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Can the Scrum Master also be the Product Owner?

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Thursday, June 30, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, June 28, 2016

AUTHOR: JEREMY JARRELL

If you’ve experimented with scrum, you’re likely familiar with the Scrum Master and Product Owner roles. But just in case you’re not, here’s a quick breakdown: The Scrum Master is responsible for ensuring that the team follows the Scrum process, while the Product Owner ensures that the team spends time building things that bring the most value to the organization. These roles sound so deceivingly simple that sometimes a single person will try tackling both.

This can happen in a ground-up implementation of scrum when a Product Owner is never officially assigned to the team, leaving the Scrum Master to fill these responsibilities. It can also happen when the team’s Scrum Master is also an individual contributor, and simply too overwhelmed to focus on the scrum process. In these cases the Product Owner may try to step up to lead the process, in addition to their own responsibilities.Regardless of the reason, when a team attempts to combine all responsibilities into a single role, it almost never ends well. Let’s look at some of the ways this can go awry, and how to fix it.

Scenario 1: Scrum Master acts as Product Owner

Most commonly, when these roles are combined, it results in the Scrum Master also wearing the hat of Product Owner. While it sounds logical, the Scrum Master may not have access to the customers to gather valuable feedback. Without actionable feedback, the team simply breaks an un-validated product down into smaller and smaller pieces delivering each incrementally. While incremental delivery is an improvement over a single large delivery, the reality is that it’s really just a more efficient way to deliver the wrong product.

When the Scrum Master acts as Product Owner, it’s easy to miss out on a coherent vision for the team, resulting in the delivery of low-value work. This can happen when the Scrum Master, lacking customer access or a true vision for the product, simply stacks the backlog with the items they find most interesting or familiar. This results in the team dusting the app by making minor enhancements to existing features or cleaning up low-priority bugs, but not accomplishing any meaningful work. In this case, low-value shouldn’t be confused with low-quality: While the team may be producing high-quality work, it doesn’t mean it’s making a meaningful impact on the product.

Scenario 2: Product Owner acts as Scrum Master

Product Ownership is a full-time job. This means that it’s easy for responsibilities outside of this role to slip. When the Product Owner acts as a Scrum Master we usually see the less tangible pieces of the scrum process slowly start to wane. Retrospectives are often the first casualty, as their outcomes can (incorrectly) seem less relevant to a busy Product Owner. While the Product Owner may not officially cancel a Retrospective, they may view it as most relevant to the development team and, therefore, leave the scheduling to them. These meetings appear unimportant to the organization and eventually die out.

Alternatively, the symptom may not be as blatant as a missed meeting. In some cases, regular meetings will still occur but you’ll start to notice that their focus subtly changes. For instance, daily standups still occur but rather than acting as a chance for the team to plan their work for the day, they slowly morph into a status meeting in which each team member reports their progress to the Product Owner. Likewise, sprint-planning meetings will still occur, but rather than the team arriving at estimates and a sprint plan together, they may find themselves bullied into uncomfortable commitments as the result of  an overzealous Product Owner.

How to fix it

Both Scrum Master and Product Owner, for the most part, are full-time jobs. When the same person attempts to fill both roles disaster almost always ensues. In the cases where the Scrum Master is filling the Product Owner’s responsibilities, the simplest solution can be to free the individual of their Scrum Master responsibilities, allowing them to focus on the Product Owner role entirely. Many Scrum Masters eventually gravitate toward the Product Owner role and, as of late, this has become a very popular career progression for those with a taste for Product Management.

Keep in mind, however, that your team still needs a Scrum Master. This is your opportunity to identify a team member who’s up for the challenge, and coach them into their new role. If successful, you’ll have a new, dedicated Scrum Master, brought up from within the team, and a new dedicated Product Owner with a background in the scrum process. That’s a pretty big win.

In situations where the Product Owner acts as Scrum Master, the solution is to find a new Scrum Master who can dedicate time to the role. Not only does this free the Product Owner from managing the Scrum process, but it also helps create healthy tension between Scrum Masters and Product Owners. Ideally, the Scrum Master and Product Owner act as opposing forces. While the Product Owner represents the interest of the customers, the Scrum Master represents the interests of the team. When a single person tries to fill both roles, this healthy tension is lost and the fulcrum inevitably tips too far in one direction.

This is often seen when the Product Owner attempts both roles, as the fulcrum may tip toward bigger feature sets and a rush to market, which not only sacrifices the team’s investment in quality, but can also take a toll on their overall well-being. Freeing the Product Owner to focus entirely on product ownership, while allowing a completely different individual to focus on the scrum process, helps restore balance and better serves the end result.

Takeaway

There are exceptions to every rule, and it is possible for one person to serve both roles successfully. Just keep in mind that this isn’t the norm, nor should it be a long-term solution. To give your organization the best chance for success when using scrum, allow two distinct individuals to serve these roles. Even if you’re struggling to find those with the right aptitude, you’ll be better off with two people who have a passion to grow into their respective roles, rather than one exceptional individual struggling to balance both.

Want to learn more about how agile really works? Check out Jeremy’s course, Agile in the Real World, for concrete strategies on making the best agile techniques work for your team.

This article was originally posted on PLURALSIGHT.

Tags:  Agile  product owner  scrummaster  scrumpractices 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Agile is not Scrum

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Tuesday, June 28, 2016

AUTHOR: ADAM MYHR

When looking for information on Agile, software development is the most common industry represented. Within those results more often than not Scrum is used as the implementation. Many articles that try to talk about Agile in a generic sense use terminology from Scrum. A common side effect of this is that many people associate Agile and Scrum on a 1 to 1 level. This is a problem.

Agile is flexible.

In learning about Agile I have come to realize that one of the main concepts is that we do not know what we do not know. As we go through a project there will be new information. In being Agile we admit that up front. We start the project when we have the least information needed. We often take breaks to see what we have learned along with what that changes along the way. Most importantly, we allow those changes to occur whether they are to the project or our process.

Scrum is well-defined.

To be considered Scrum there are very specific rules that must be adhered to. If any of them are missing Scrum is not truly taking place. If any of them are in place in name only then at best “Scrum-but” is taking place. The entirety of what is required for Scrum to happen can be condensed into a 16 page guide or a 20 page primer. Nothing more and nothing less is required to be Scrum.

Agile guides decision

.

The heart of Agile is a set of values. Drilling down to the next level of Agile as defined for software development are a set of guiding principles. In none of the values or principles is an edict for activity made. They are all ideals to keep at the forefront of decision-making. They are meant to shape how a project is approached, not dictate the method used for accomplishing work.

Scrum dictates process structure.

The heart of scrum is a set of roles, events, and artifacts. The roles people play on a project team are consolidated to one of three named positions. There are specific meetings that must take place every iteration. Work must be structured and queued in a certain way. Inside of this defined shell is Scrum. Outside of it is something else.

Agile is a way of thinking.

Agile thinking can benefit any project. Agile thinking is also something that can be done in many different working environments. An Emergency Room can be run as an Agile project using a method such as Kanban. Agile thinking is open thinking. Open to change. Open to improvement. Open to modifications. Agile thinking allows for bonds to be as broad as practical.

Scrum is a framework for getting work done.

Scrum is specific to product development, specifically software development. Scrum allows for flexibility, but only inside of the framework. Anything that is outside of the framework is an addition to scrum. It is allowed, but only if it does not undermine the framework itself. Anything removed from the framework means Scrum is no longer happening.

Scrum is Agile but Agile is not Scrum.

Just as all Fords are vehicles but not all vehicles are Fords Scrum is Agile but Agile is not Scrum. Scrum is something that, when used properly, is Agile. It allows for constant, short feedback cycles. It allows for continuous improvement. It gives transparency to the people who need it. Agile allows for more. Agile allows the framework to change as needed to best deliver value to the customer. Agile allows people to be placed in front of defined roles.

Scrum is a good place to start an Agile journey. It is simple on paper and in concept. It is widespread and shows a lot of success over the last decade. It is well understood and the benefits can easily be explained to the organization at large. The structure for Scrum can be mapped out and placed in an organization in a very short time frame. As an Agile Coach I would default to Scrum for most software development environments at the outset. In the end though, Agile needs to be more important than Scrum. Scrum is going to work. It might even be the best solution. Once a team trends towards high-performing the framework of Scrum must not be a limiting factor in improving the product and performance of that team. For this reason, even though I would start as Scrum, as an Agile Coach I would be open Scrum-but over Pure Scrum in more cases than I would be blatantly against it. 

This article was originally posted on Our Agile Journey

Tags:  agile  agilepractices  scrumpractices 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Six tips for hiring Agile people with Lena Bednarikova

Posted By Meghan Robinson, Friday, April 15, 2016

 "One of the most effortless ways to enable your cultural change is to “let the right one in” – to hire people who already possess the desired attributes of your intended culture and your future organisation. These people will do all the hard work for you, without even knowing it."


Lenka Bednarikova is passionate about creating great teams. Her experience spans across specialist IT agencies, regional companies, and multinational organisations such as Nokia and Microsoft where she helped transform their recruitment processes to create the right environment for Agile and customer focus. Lenka is well versed in hands-on recruitment, Agile and traditional project management. She is a board member of the Institute of Recruiters and currently also enjoying herself as a Scrum Master at BankWest.

 

Interested in what she has to say? Click HERE to read more!   

Tags:  agile  hiring  interviews  IT  scrummaster  scrumpractices  Technology  workplace 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

You're Invited!

Posted By Meghan Robinson - Scrum, Friday, March 11, 2016


    

We invite you to embark on a journey at a brand-new event, taking place in Orlando, April 19–20, 2016: the AgileCareers Networking Expo. AgileCareers is the only job board dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals. AgileCareers contributes to Transforming the World of Work by offering a platform that has the tools and technology to help build those professional synergies. 

Attendees will start exploring exhibiting organizations to discuss career opportunities. AgileCareers team members will offer guidance to organizations on how to market their career opportunities to attract top candidates. Employers can schedule interviews with candidates for the following day at the Wednesday AgileCareers Networking Expo. Scrum Alliance® will also showcase features of its new state-of-the-art job site.

Many of the job seekers on AgileCareers have been trained and certified by Scrum Alliance and have achieved their Certified ScrumMaster® certification or Certified Scrum Product Owner® certification. These individuals are ready to join your Scrum and Agile teams! 

Benefits of Attending the AgileCareers Networking Expo 

  • Network with other Agile organizations, schedule interviews, and walk away with highly qualified candidates.
  • Promote your organization's brand as a great place to work.
  • Gain access and exposure at the Agile conference next door, the Global Scrum Gathering® Orlando.

Looking to hire Scrum and Agile Talent? Email us for booth prices - 50% off for a limited time!

Current member looking for job opportunities? Register Now

 

Tags:  agile  hiring  interviews  job posting  networking  scrumpractices 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 2
1  |  2

AgileCareers is dedicated to connecting Scrum and Agile organizations with qualified, passionate Agile professionals. We strive to Transform the World of Work by offering a platform that has the resources and technology to help build those professional synergies.